Another attempt at security for the Internet Of Things

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Google and others back Internet of Things security push | Engadget

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An issue that is perplexing the personal-computing scene is data security and user privacy in the context of dedicated-function devices including the Internet Of Things. This has lately come to the fore thanks to the KRACK WPA2 wireless-network security exploit which mainly affects Wi-Fi client devices. In this situation, it would be of concern regarding these devices due to the fact that the device vendors and the chipset vendors don’t regularly update the software for their devices.

But ARM Holdings, a British chipmaker behind the ARM RISC microarchitecture used in mobile devices and most dedicated-function devices has joined with Google Cloud Platform and others to push for an Internet-Of-Things data security platform. This is very relevant because the ARM RISC microarchitecture satisfies the needs of dedicated-function device designs due to the ability to yield greater functionalities using lean power requirements compared to traditional microarchitecture.

Here, the effort is centred around open-source firmware known as “Firmware-M” that is to be pitched for ARMv8-M CPUs. The Platform Security Architecture will allow the ability for hardware / software / cloud-system designers to tackle IoT threat models and analyse the firmware with a security angle. This means that they can work towards hardware and firmware architectures that have a “best-practice approach” for security and user-friendliness for devices likely to be used by the typical householder.

There is still the issue of assuring software maintenance over the lifecycle of the typical IoT and dedicated-function device. This will include how newer updated firmware should be deployed to existing devices and how often such updates should take place. It will also have to include practices associated with maintaining devices abandoned by their vendors such as when a vendor ceases to exist or changes hands or a device reaches end-of-life.

But at least it is another effort by industry to answer the data-security and user-privacy realities associated with the Internet Of Things.

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