Multiroom to be another common feature for smart speakers

Article

Amazon Echo on kitchen bench press photo courtesy of Amazon USA

Amazon Echo – to become another online multiroom audio system

Amazon Echo multiroom audio not far off, report says | CNet

My Comments

A feature that is showing up with the “smart speakers” that are part of the various voice-driven home assistant platforms is the ability for multiple speakers of the same platform to work as a multiroom system. This is where the same content source can be played through multiple speakers of that same platform, including the ability to have multiple speakers or audio devices in a logical group representing, perhaps, a floor or an area of the house. This functionality is taking on the audio-content playback abilities like Spotify, TuneIn Radio, Tidal and others offered by the various voice-driven home assistant platforms

Google Home – already a multiroom audio system as well as a smart speaker

Google has already established it with their Home speakers and Chromecast-based audio connectivity devices. But Alexa are intending to join in by allowing you to play the same content source through multiple Echo speakers and to treat a group of speakers as a logical unit. Let’s not forget that while the market’s competitive, Apple and Microsoft won’t want to miss out on the idea of multiroom audio as part of their voice-activated home assistant platforms.

Similarly, Amazon have aligned their Alexa platform with DTS’s PlayFi multiroom audio platform which is pitched at the premium hi-fi market. They have a large number of the hi-fi names with them and are wanting to integrate full Alexa voice functionality in to their speakers and other audio devices.

There may be some feature possibilities that may end up in the product evolution for these smart-speaker platforms. One of these could be to set one or more pairs of speakers up as stereo pairs which can yield the improved separation when you listen to stereo content. Similarly, there could be the idea of creating a multiple-microphone array out of a group of speakers to make it easier for the voice-driven home assistant to understand you.

Who knows how hot the competition for the voice-driven home assistant that talks to you is going to be and whether this will mimic the home videocassette format wars of the early 80s?

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Mixing audio and Bluetooth Low Energy–what is happening

Article

Sony SBH-52 Bluetooth Headphone Audio Adaptor

Audio over Bluetooth Low Energy could make these devices last for a long time on a single battery charge

Apple Used Bluetooth Low Energy Audio for Cochlear Implant iPhone Accessory | MacRumors

My Comments

Any of you who have used Bluetooth headsets with your smartphones may have come across situations where the headset ceases to function or sounds the “low battery” signal when you use these devices a lot. This can happen more so if you are listening to music then make or take a long phone call using the headset and is something I had experienced many times with the Sony SBH-52 audio adaptor. But the audio protocol is being worked on to avoiding consuming too much battery runtime.

Plantronics BackBeat Pro Bluetooth noise-cancelling headphones

.. as it could with Bluetooth headsets

Apple and Cochlear, who are behind the Australian-invented Cochlear Implant hearing-assistance technology, have developed Bluetooth Low Energy Audio to provide a high-quality audio link between mobile devices and headsets but make very little demands on the battery. As well, the Bluetooth Special Interest Group are working on a similar protocol to achieve these same gains, with the goal to have it part of Bluetooth 5.0. But this has to be supported in a vendor-independent manner in the same context as the current Bluetooth audio technologies that are in circulation.

But why is there an imperative to develop a low-energy audio profile for Bluetooth?

One key usage class is to integrate Bluetooth audio functionality in to hearing aids and similar hearing-assistance devices that are expected to run for a very long time. Here, we are also talking about very small intra-aural devices that may sit in or on your ear or be integrated in a set of eyeglasses. The goal is to allow not just for audio access to your smartphone during calls or multimedia activity but even to have an audio pathway from the phone’s microphone to the hearing-assistance device as well as the phone being a control surface for that device.

Similarly, there is a usage goal to improve battery runtime for Bluetooth headsets and audio adaptors such as to avoid the situation I have described above. It can also cater towards improved intra-aural Bluetooth headset designs or lightweight designs that can, again, run for a long time.

Let’s not forget the fact that smartwatches are being given audio abilities, typically to allow for use with a voice-activated personal assistant. But devices of this ilk could be set up to serve full time as a Bluetooth headphone audio adaptor with the full hands-free operation. The expectation here as well could even be to have the display on the wearable active while in use, whether to show the time, steps taken or metadata about the call in progress or whatever you are listening to.

Once audio over Bluetooth Low Energy technology is standardised, it could be a major improvement path for Bluetooth-based audio applications.

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An Internet-connected laptop could replace the link van for location broadcasting

Article

Dell Inspiron 15 Gaming laptop

A laptop of the Dell Inspiron 15 7000 Gaming class could end up as today’s equivalent of an outside-broadcast link truck if the BBC has its way

BBC livestreaming Edinburgh festival from a laptop | CNet

From the horse’s mouth

BBC

IP Studio whitepaper

My Comments

If you watch news, sports, live concerts or similar content on TV, you will be seeing location broadcasting at work as they bring that footage to your screen.

Typically, a location broadcast that any TV studio does either required the use of video recordings that were transported to the studio before broadcast. Or they relied on a “link truck” which is a vehicle equipped with an antenna that beamed the location signal back to the studio using a microwave link if the idea is to allow the studio access to real-time vision. Some regular venues that are regular sources of content may implement a wired connection facilitated by a leased line between that venue and the studio.

Such setups have been limited by the amount of time required to locate the link truck and establish these radio links. This can also be limited through factors like weather or making sure of a line-of-sight connection to the studio’s link tower.

But the Internet and the size of computer technology has opened up the possibility of a laptop of the same or better calibre as the Dell Inspiron 15 7000 Gaming I recently reviewed connected to a high-bandwidth Internet connection as an alternative to the traditional location broadcast setup, especially for shows directly streamed to the Internet. The technology which is called IP Studio is part of an effort that Auntie Beeb is taking towards implementing IP technology for TV-show production. In this context, it is about being able to use a mobile wireless network to interconnect the cameras to the laptops for location broadcasting.

Here, they are using the Edinburgh Festival and Edinburgh Fringe Festival to prove a setup based around laptops that are uplinking to the Internet via the same kind of technology used for Internet service. The editing software that is being used is primarily a Web-app which works in the browser rather than a standalone app. But it could allow for the link-van approach where a laptop is used to upload the edited vision to the broadcaster’s studio to be inserted in to the program.

Once it is proven, the BBC’s IP Studio technology which is based primarily on open-source tools, could be seen as beneficial for all sorts of broadcasters who want to save money and set-up / tear-down time on and see increased flexibility with their location work. For example, news-gathering teams could be able to set up and “go live” on that breaking event or press conference with a very short lead-time.

The same technology could open up affordable location-broadcasting technology to community broadcasters and specific-event Webcasters who place importance on cost-effective setups. Even organisations who have video-editing talent in their staff or volunteer collection could see this technology appeal to them.

What this is showing is that the Internet and cost-effective computer design is making big-time broadcasting and production technology more affordable.

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Traditional movie and TV studios shine towards direct video-on-demand services

Article

Apple TV 4th Generation press picture courtesy of Apple

Could the various smart-TV platforms like Apple TV, Chromecast or Roku be required to run “content malls”

Disney Is Dumping Netflix And Launching New Streaming Apps | FastCompany

My Comments

Traditionally, movie and TV production studios have been making their wares available through distributors or other third-party elements.

But what has happened is that they are moving towards running their own video-on-demand services in a similar way to how some manufacturers and first-party distributors have set up their own “direct” mail-order or online storefronts in the US market.

Disney is heading this way by moving their content from Netflix to their own service, something they were announcing as part of a third-quarter earnings call. It may sound close to the established “catch-up TV” model especially where the TV channels are running their own content for a long time on their video-on-demand services. Here, Disney sees this service they are exposing as the online home for some of their content like Toy Story 4 or the live-action version of the Lion King, along with putting their library of TV and movie content onto video-on-demand. Could this mean the ability to “pull up” Disney’s short cartoons that graced Saturday morning children’s TV or the early part of the cinema sessions before and after World War II. Or the ability to see those classic animated feature-length movies that

Here, it is similar to what HBO and CBS have been working on by offering a direct video-on-demand service for their content. But the “studio-direct” model could lead to difficulties in navigating content of a kind offered by multiple studios, as well as requiring potential viewers to sign up with multiple video-on-demand providers. In some cases, it may also affect whether a potential viewer signs on because of the cost of the service or the kind of business model offered by the provider. It may appeal to those of us who shine to a particular studio’s output.

Studio-direct VOD along with niche VOD may then lead to a requirement to establish video-on-demand as a “content mall” facilitated by mobile / desktop-computing platforms and smart-TV / set-top / games-console platforms. This may involve the use of content directories that link to the service providers in a similar vein to TuneIn Radio or vTuner for Internet radio. At the moment, Roku is the only provider who is working close to a “content mall” for their set-top platform, but there will be pressure on other platforms to take this approach.

It is very interesting times ahead for video-on-demand as the traditional “single-front” Netflix model falls away to the mall-based approach.

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USB 3.2–coming soon to your computer

Article

USB 3.2 to use the same USB Type-C connector as USB 3.1, but with increased throughput

USB-C is already getting a major update, and it will double data transfer speeds | Mashable

My Comments

The USB connection has been recently revised once more, but this time it is about increased bandwidth.

This standard emerges in the form of the USB 3.2 which allows for bandwidths of at least 15Gb/s thanks to the use of multi-lane technology.

It uses the same physical connection standards as USB 3.1, which means that devices equipped to this standard will use USB-C connections and you can connect your compliant host devices to your compliant peripherals using USB-C cables. But this system will work on a “best-case” approach where if both the host and peripheral device are USB 3.2 compliant, you will benefit from the higher throughput whereas in other cases, the link will step back to USB 3.1 specifications.

Once the standard is set in stone, you may find that some devices such as some computer USB interface chipsets may support in-field software-based upgrading for this standard. On the other hand, a subsequent generation of computer and peripheral equipment will end up being equipped for this standard.

The main applications I see this connection come in to its own would be high-capacity external storage applications or high-resolution display setups. But of course, there will be the USB hubs and docks (expansion modules) that are about increased connectivity being equipped with this connection type.

Personally, I would see USB 3.2 become a “next-generation” approach for USB-based peripheral and device connectivity, something to look forward with subsequent generations of computer equipment.

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NVIDIA offers external graphics module support for their Quadro workstation graphics cards

Articles

Razer Blade gaming Ultrabook connected to Razer Core external graphics module - press picture courtesy of Razer

NVIDIA allows you to turn a high-performance Ultrabook like the Razer Blade in to a mobile workstation when you plant a Quadro graphics card in an external graphics module like the Razer Core

Nvidia rolls out external GPU support for Nvidia Quadro | CNet

NVIDIA External GPUs Bring New Creative Power to Millions of Artists and Designers | MarketWired

From the horse’s mouth

NVIDIA

Press Release

My Comments

Over the last year, there has been a slow trickle of external graphics modules that “soup up” the graphics capabilities of computers like laptops, all-in-ones and highly-compact desktops by using outboard graphics processors. Typically these devices connect to the host computer using a Thunderbolt 3 connection which provides a bandwidth equivalent to the PCI Express expansion-card standard used for desktop computers.

At the moment, this approach for improving a computer system’s graphics abilities has been focused towards gaming-grade graphics cards and chipsets, which has left people who want workstation-grade graphics performance in the lurch.

But NVIDIA has answered this problem by providing a driver update for their TITAN X and Quadro workstation graphics cards. This allows Windows to work with these cards even if they are installed in a “card-cage” external graphics module rather than on the host computer’s motherboard.

Not just that, NVIDIA are to start allowing external-graphics-module manufacturers to tender their products for certification so that they are proven by NVIDIA to allow these cards to work reliably to optimum performance. This may be different to the context of a certified workstation where all the components in that particular computer are certified by Autodesk and similar software vendors to work reliably and perform at their best with their CAD or similar software.

What is being pitched in this context is a “thin-and-light” laptop of the Dell XPS 13 kind (including the 2-in-1 variant);  an “all-in-one” desktop computer like the HP Envy 34 Curved All-In-One or an ultra-compact “next unit of computing” unit like the Intel Skull Canyon being able to do workstation-class tasks with the kind of graphics card that best suits this computing requirement.

The question that some workstation users will then raise is whether the computer’s main processor and RAM are up to these tasks even though a workstation-grade graphics card is added on; and then consider this approach unsatisfactory even though the host computer has a lot of RAM and / or runs with a Core i7 CPU. But something like a gaming laptop that uses a gaming-calibre graphics chipset may benefit from the Quadro in an external graphics “card cage” module when this system is destined to do a lot of video editing, CAD or animation work.

Personally, I see the concept of the Quadro workstation graphics chipset in an external graphics module as a way to allow hobbyists and small-time professionals to slowly put their foot in the door of high-performance workstation computing.

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Product Review–Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 convertible Ultrabook

Introduction

Dell has established the XPS 13 as a value-priced Ultrabook that ticks the boxes when it comes to the kind of functionality that it offers for its product class. There was some doubt that they would offer a “2-in-1” ultraportable computer under this banner alongside the traditional “clamshell” model, due to there not being an essential need for that class of computer.

Now they have offered a 2-in-1 convertible variant of the XPS 13 and it is what I am reviewing. There are two different configurations being offered for this model, one with the Intel Core i5 CPU, 8Gb RAM and 256Gb solid-state storage alongside the premium variant which comes with an Intel Core i7 CPU, 16Gb RAM and 512Gb solid-state storage.

Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 Ultrabook at Rydges Melbourne

Price
– this configuration highlighted in bold
RRP price
AUD$2798.99
(i7 CPU, 16Gb RAM, 512Gb SSD)
AUD$2599.99
(i7 CPU, 8Gb RAM, 256Gb SSD)
AUD$2299.99
(i5 CPU 8Gb RAM 256Gb SSD)
Market Positioning Premium Consumer Ultraportable
Form Factor Convertible laptop
Processor Intel Core i7 Kaby Lake
cheaper option:
Intel Core i5 Kaby Lake
RAM 16 GB
cheaper option: 8 Gb
Secondary storage 512 GB SSD
cheaper option:
256Gb SSD
MicroSD XC card reader
Display Subsystem Intel HD Graphics 615 integrated display Can support eGPU modules
Screen 13” widescreen touch display (3200 x 1800) LED backlit LCD
Audio Subsystem Intel HD audio
Audio Improvements Waves MaxxAudio Pro
Network Wi-Fi 802.11a/g/n/ac dual stream
Ethernet
Bluetooth 4.2
Modems
Connectivity USB and Thunderbolt 3 1 x USB-C with DisplayPort and Power Delivery including Sleep and Charge
1 x Thunderbolt 3 with Power Delivery including Sleep and Charge
Other Data Connections
Video DisplayPort via USB-C
Audio 3.5mm input-output jack
Digital audio via DisplayPort (USB-C)
Authentication and Security Fingerprint Reader
RealSense camera
Operating System in supplied configuration Windows 10 Home
Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 Ultrabook in presentation viewer mode

Presentation Viewer mode

The computer itself

Aesthetics and Build Quality

Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 Ultrabook in tablet mode

Tablet mode

The Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 had the same build quality as the XPS 13 clamshell where it came across as being very durable. The outside is finished in aluminium while the keyboard surround maintains that rubberised finish that provides that tactile non-slippery feel. The only disadvantage I see with this is a combination of oily hands and fine dusty materials may have it look dirty.

This convertible smoothly swivels all the way from closed to a tablet position and even closes up neatly and tightly. This again makes for something that has the smooth feel to it.

Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 Ultrabook in tent mode

Tent mode

I paid attention to how this computer kept its cool, with respect to system performance, battery runtime and user comfort. Here, I haven’t noticed any overheating going on even after I viewed video content on this system. This is thanks to the metal housing and the way the system is architected to work in the context of an ultra-thin design.

User Interface

The illuminated keyboard has that distinct feedback that allows for accurate typing especially if you are a touch-typist. It lights up in an “on-demand” manner that avoids excessive battery drain but can be turned off. The way I have seen the keyboard light up means that the keys are more discoverable especially for those of us who are one-finger or two-finger typists.

The multi-touch trackpad works as expected and doesn’t act in a hair-trigger manner, so you don’t have to worry about disabling it if you are working on your lap. The touchscreen works as expected for a tablet screen but at times can be a bit unresponsive especially if you have your hands on the edge.

The Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 comes with a one-touch smartphone-style fingerprint reader just under the keyboard where you just put your finger in the one place for it to be recognised. This works in conjunction with the Windows 10 Hello functionality that allows for fingerprint recognition and Dell also supplied the Keeper password vault for those of us who want to keep our online service passwords on a secure digital keychain.

Here, it is the second consumer-focused computer that I have come across for review to be equipped with such a device, something typically associated with business-grade computers. What I had found from my experience was that it was reliable to scan even if you had something like the oil from deep-fried food on your fingers. But you have to scan your finger lengthways as well as pointing vertically during the Windows Hello setup procedure so it works when you are using the XPS 13 2-in-1 Ultrabook as a tablet.

Audio / Video

The Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 implements the MaxxAudio sound-tuning but I have tried it with playing music using the Spotify online music service. Here, the sound from the internal speakers is very typical of what is offered for laptops, especially the “thin-and-light” units thanks to the small chassis. This means that you don’t get the full sound reproduction when you use these speakers and it may be good enough for notification sounds or dialogue, but I would recommend using external speakers, headphones or a sound system if you want to enjoy playing music through this laptop.

The video playback behaviour for this computer has come through very smoothly especially with on-demand content and can show that you could use it for any class of video content. It would also work well for gaming environments that aren’t too demanding.

Connectivity, Storage And Expansion

Left-hand-side connections – Thunderbolt 3 over USB-C port with PowerShare and USB Power Delivery, audio input-output jack

The peripheral-connectivity options for the Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 are a pair of USB-C connectors. One of these is a Thunderbolt 3 connector that comes in handy with equipment like external graphics modules while the other is equipped with DisplayPort alt connectivity for use when you want to connect an external screen as long as  you use the appropriate adaptor or expansion module dock. Both of these ports implement the USB Power Delivery specification and also implement the PowerShare “sleep and charge” option, only enabled through the BIOS user interface rather than a Windows program.

Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 Ultrabook - USB-C power

USB-C as the power connection

The Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 has become the first computer model that I have had access to for review which implements the USB-C connections exclusively as a peripheral connection and power-input connection. It is a sign of things to come with laptops that are designed to be thin and light where this kind of connection will be the only peripheral connection type. But I am pleased that there are the two connections compared to just one of them, thus still allowing you to connect more devices at once.

Right-hand-side connections – USB-C port with DisplayPort alt video mode, USB Power Delivery and PowerShare; MicroSD card reader

There is also an audio jack as the other device connectivity option, compared to the XPS 13 which implements standard USB connections for other peripherals. Let’s not forget that the XPS 13 2-in-1 comes with a short adaptor cable that allows you to connect devices with the traditional USB Type-A connector to one of the USB-C sockets. If you are wanting more connectivity, I would consider using the Dell DA200 USB-C connector module if it is just external displays, USB peripherals and an Ethernet networks segment you want to connect or the Minix Neo C USB Multiport Adaptor if it’s your digital camera’s SD card you want to download while being able to connect external displays, Ethernet networks and other peripherals.

The secondary storage options available are adequate for most portable-computing needs. This is through the entry-level variant coming with a 256Gb SSD and the premium variant coming with the 512Gb SSD. Personally, I would like to see Dell offer a step-up variant or mid-tier option with the 512 Gb SSD as the only incremental feature over the entry-level model to court those of us who aren’t chasing the performance expectations but want something that can make it appeal as a sole-use computer.

Thanks to the slimline design goal, the Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 convertible laptop has a microSD card slot as its integrated removable-media option. This will be a limitation for those of us who use digital cameras or camcorders and want to download images to the computer by removing the SD-card “film” from the camera and inserting it in the computer. In this case, you would have to use an SD card reader that plugs in to the computer’s USB-C port with or without an adaptor.

The Wi-Fi network adaptor still works effectively even if it is on the fringe of a Wi-Fi network segment and still provides the necessary throughput.

Battery Life

The non-removable battery in the Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 convertible Ultrabook is able to satisfy general-purpose computing tasks for a day without the need for you to carry the charger with you. I even ran a TV show from SBS On Demand for an hour and found that the battery had 68% capacity left in it after that.

These results may be typical for a relatively-new machine and the battery may not last as long for a unit that has been in service for many years.

Other Usage Notes

The people in the different communities that I associate with whom I have shown this computer to are impressed with the fact that this computer answers the thin-and-light market call while also being an elegant 2-in-1 convertible. At the moment the only thing that will put them off the computer would be the price.

Limitations And Points Of Improvement

As far as the USB-C connections go, an improvement I would like to see would be to provide the same advanced connection types i.e. Thunderbolt 3 and DisplayPort alt on both ports. This may involve having the computer effectively have two Thunderbolt 3 host interfaces and two DisplayPort connections off its Intel HD integrated graphics circuitry, but could allow for simplified error-proof connectivity of display devices and Thunderbolt 3 peripherals.

In relation to the Thunderbolt 3 connection, the Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 could implement a high-power performance-focused stance while it is connected to an external graphics module that supplies the right amount of power. This would then make it able to handle advanced graphics tasks like gaming at home, but this may be limited by issues regarding heat management for a thin-and-light chassis.

A feature that would improve the Dell XPS 13 2-in-1’s useability would be to have dedicated volume buttons on the edge of the screen or as touch buttons on the bottom of the screen to allow the user to instantly regulate sound volume when playing multimedia. This would be more of importance when the computer is operating in a tablet, presentation viewer or tent mode.

Similarly, providing a standard SD card reader in a 2-in-1 Ultrabook like this may be a challenge but could be looked at especially for those of us who use these computers to download pictures or footage from our good digital cameras or camcorders

Conclusion

I would see the Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 Ultrabook as a viable option for someone who is after a “Yoga-style” convertible notebook but want something that conveys a thin, light and elegant image. The configurations that are available at least put its RAM and storage capacities above average for its peers offered by its competitors and definitely underscore value for money for its product class.

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Europeans could compete with Silicon Valley when offering online services

Map of Europe By User:mjchael by using preliminary work of maix¿? [CC-BY-SA-2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia CommonsVery often I have read articles from European sources about the Silicon Valley companies not respecting European values like privacy. This ends up with the European Commission taking legal action against the powerful Silicon Valley tech kings like Facebook or Google, ending up with placing requirements or levying fines on these companies.

But what can Europe also do to resolve these issues?

They could encourage European-based companies to work on Internet services like Web-search, social networking, file storage and the like that compete with what Silicon Valley offers. But what they offer can be about services that respect European personal and business values like democracy, privacy and transparency.

There has been some success in this field in the aerospace industry with Airbus rising up to challenge Boeing. This was more evident with Airbus releasing the A380 high-capacity double-decker long-haul jet and Boeing offering the 787 Dreamliner jet that was focused on saving energy. Let’s not forget the rise of Arianespace in France who established a competing space program to what NASA offered.

But why are the Europeans concerned about Silicon Valley’s behaviour? Part of it is to do with Continental Europe’s darkest time in modern history where there was the rise of the Hitler, Mussolini and Stalin dictatorships, underscored by Hitler’s Germany taking over significant areas in France and Eastern Europe before the Second World War. This was followed up with the Cold War where most of Eastern Europe was effectively a group of communist dictatorships loyal to the Soviet Union. In both these situations, the affected countries were run as police states where their national security services were conducting mass surveillance at the behest of the country’s dictator.

There are a few of these businesses putting themselves on the map. Of course we known that Spotify, the main worldwide online jukebox, is based in Sweden. But Sweden, the land of ABBA, Volvo, IKEA, Electrolux and  Assa Abloy, also has CloudMe, a cloud-based file-storage service on their soil. It is also alongside SoundCloud, the go-to audio-content server for Internet-based talent, which is based in Germany. The French also put their foot in the IoT space with a smart lock retrofit kit that has Web management with its server based in France.

A few search engines are setting up shop in Europe with Unbubble.eu (German) and StartPage (Dutch) metasearch engines in operation and Qwant and Findx search engines that create their own indexes. But the gaps that I have noticed here is the existence of a social network or display ad platform that are based in Europe and support the European personal and business values.

There are also the issues associated with competing heavily against the Silicon Valley giants, such as establishing presence in the European or global market and defining your brand. Here, they would have to identify those people and businesses in Europe and the world who place emphasis on the distinct European values and know how to effectively compete against the established brands.

The European Commission could help companies competing with the Silicon Valley IT establishment by providing information and other aid along with providing a list of European-based companies who can compete with this establishment. They could also underpin research and development efforts for these companies who want to innovate in a competitive field. It can also include the ability for multiple companies in the IT, consumer-electronics and allied fields to work towards establishing services that can have a stronger market presence and compete effectively with Silicon Valley.

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Microsoft Paint–here to stay but available down another path

Articles

Windows Paint – here to stay but will be available through Windows Store

Microsoft Paint isn’t dead yet, will live in the Windows Store for free | The Verge

Classic MS Paint is coming to the Windows Store, for FREE! | Windows Central

From the horse’s mouth

Microsoft

Windows Experience Blog

My Comments

Recently the computer press has been awash with articles that Microsoft was killing the Paint app that always came with Windows since 1.0 . But they are keeping it available for Windows users to continue working with by allowing them to download it for free from the Windows Store.

The Paint app was simply a basic bitmap-driven graphics editor that allowed users to get used to using a mouse for creating computer graphics. It was based on ZSoft’s PC Paintbrush which was the PC’s answer to the various baseline graphics editors that came with every mouse-driven graphical user interface since 1984 when that kind of computing came on board with the Apple Macintosh.

This app ended up being the answer for any basic computer-graphics work at home or in the office, whether it be children creating computer drawings through to designers creating rough prototypical images of what they are designing in the office. I have infact used Paint as part of creating screenshots for this Website by editing the various screenshots whether to redact private information or to call out particular menu options that I am talking about in the accompanying article. This was thanks to an easier learning curve that this software implemented from Day 1.

A common fear that I would have expressed in relation to the press coverage about Microsoft abandoning or paying less attention to Paint and other bundled or cost-effective graphics tools (remember PhotoDraw?) is that they could end up stripping down their application-software portfolio of titles seen to be less valuable. Then they would just focus their efforts on the popular premium business software like the “Office” essentials such as Word, Excel and PowerPoint.

At least those of you who buy a computer with Windows 10 Fall (Autumn) Creators Update in situ don’t have to miss that basic Paint app because it’s not delivered “out of the box”. Rather they can raid the Windows Store and find this app.

But could this be the path for evergreen software that was always distributed for free as a standalone package or with operating systems like graphics or sound editors by the major operating-system vendors?

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Google Home–now in Australia and on your TV

Article

Google Home: Australian Review | Lifehacker Australia

From the horse’s mouth

Google

TV commercial – click or tap to play

My Comments

I have given regular mention of Google Home as a competitor in the smart home assistant space alongside Amazon Echo. At the time I wrote the previous articles, none of these services were available in Australia.

But since this week, Google Home has become the first of the smart home assistant platforms to be released in to Australia. They are offering these devices for AUD$199 at least through JB Hi-Fi, Harvey Norman and Officeworks, and is being linked to most of the ABC live and on-demand audio services along with Sky News and Fox Sports for local news services.

Google have even gone out of their way to promote this device on the TV by using an Australian-localised 30-second version of their Super Bowl TV ad including a question about the noise a kookaburra makes.

But I would suspect that Amazon won’t take this lying down and there will be pressure to make sure that their Echo devices and Alexa platform are on the scene as soon as possible. This would also apply to Microsoft and Apple when they get their home assistant platforms off the ground.

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